About The Owner

Chelsea was born and raised in Long Island, NY. She attended the University of Maryland, College Park, and obtained her Bachelor of Science degree in Public Health in 2014. After her undergraduate studies, Chelsea found her path to nursing and embarked on an intense 17-month accelerated BSN program at The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing.

Upon graduating from nursing school and passing her boards, Chelsea moved across the country to begin her nursing career in Los Angeles, CA as a Mother-Baby nurse. After gaining experience in mother-baby, she went on to become a NICU nurse and hasn’t looked back since! Chelsea took her passion for NICU nursing to new heights in 2021 when she began working as a travel NICU nurse, allowing her to practice in multiple states and work with different demographics of patients. Alongside this, Chelsea became a Child Passenger Safety Technician (CPST) with the goal of helping parents properly install and secure their car seats.

Chelsea’s work in the NICU fueled her passion for caring for newborns and educating parents on navigating life with and advocating for their new bundle of joy. This led her to create I Know Newborns (IKN), LLC in 2023. Chelsea currently resides in New Jersey and is pursuing a Master’s Degree in Nursing Education. In her spare time, Chelsea likes to model, take care of her plant babies, bake her infamous cheesecakes, and go to the spa for some well-deserved rest and relaxation.

IKN’s mission is to build brighter beginnings, one newborn at a time. I aim to equip Black and Brown parents with the confidence and resources to care for their babies safely, reducing racial inequity in infant mortality and morbidity. Education plays a vital role in addressing health disparities, and I strive to be a reliable source for Black and Brown parents, fostering healthier outcomes for their newborns.

As a travel NICU nurse with an entrepreneurial spirit, I founded I Know Newborns (IKN) to educate and support new parents on basic newborn care and the NICU experience. My passion for minority health, sparked during my time as a Public Health scholar at the University of Maryland, drives me to address racial healthcare disparities affecting Black infant patients.

As a travel NICU nurse with an entrepreneurial spirit, I founded I Know Newborns (IKN) to educate and support new parents on basic newborn care and the NICU experience. My passion for minority health, sparked during my time as a Public Health scholar at the University of Maryland, drives me to address racial healthcare disparities affecting Black infant patients.

The 2020 Black infant mortality rates were more than double those of their White counterparts, reflecting alarming racial disparities in infant death causes. By empowering Black and Brown parents with essential knowledge and advocacy skills, I believe we can lower preventable infant mortality rates and combat institutional racism within healthcare.

Infant Mortality Facts

As a professional dedicated to lowering black infant mortality rates, it is vital that we understand the alarming data surrounding this issue. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides crucial information on infant mortality, which refers to the heartbreaking loss of an infant before their first birthday. This data serves as a powerful indicator of the overall health of our society. Here are some of the most recent data highlighting the impact of infant mortality on the Black/African American population:

Non-Hispanic Black/African American infants have a 2.4 times higher infant mortality rate compared to non-Hispanic White infants.

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Non-Hispanic Black/African American infants are almost four times as likely to die from complications related to low birthweight as non-Hispanic White infants.

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In 2020, non-Hispanic Black/African American mothers were twice as likely to receive late or no prenatal care compared to non-Hispanic White mothers.

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Non-Hispanic Black/African American infants are almost four times as likely to die from complications related to low birthweight as non-Hispanic White infants.

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In 2020, non-Hispanic Black/African American mothers were twice as likely to receive late or no prenatal care compared to non-Hispanic White mothers.

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The leading causes of infant mortality among African Americans in 2020 were low birth weight, congenital malformations, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), accidents (unintentional injuries), and maternal complications. Disparities exist in each of these causes between non-Hispanic Black and non-Hispanic White populations.

Furthermore, data reveals differences in prenatal care utilization during pregnancy. Non-Hispanic Black/African American mothers had a lower percentage of first-trimester prenatal care and a higher percentage of receiving late or no prenatal care compared to non-Hispanic White mothers. 

The CDC data also shows the infant mortality rate per 1,000 live births based on the age of the mother. Non-Hispanic Black infants consistently had higher mortality rates across all age groups compared to non-Hispanic White infants, with the disparities being more pronounced among younger mothers.

Dedicated to reducing black infant mortality rates, it is essential that we, me as a NIUC nurse, acknowledge the gravity of these disparities.. The data highlights the pressing need for collaborative efforts to improve Black maternal health outcomes, enhance access to timely prenatal care, and address the multifaceted factors contributing to these alarming disparities. Every life lost is a heartbreaking tragedy, however, we must work together to create a future where every Black baby has a chance to thrive and grow because Black babies matter.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2022, June 22). Infant Mortality. Retrieved July 9, 2023, from https://www.cdc.gov/reproductivehealth/maternalinfanthealth/infantmortality.htm